More on Colloidal Silver and Killing Germs

“Colloidal silver kills bacteria.” This is what adverts are promoting about colloidal silver. Is it true? That’s the question. As a scrap metal yard here in Los Angeles, we deal day in and day out with metals. It’s rather obvious that aluminum cans get melted down and remade into…more aluminum cans! But as we wrote in our last post, some metals are used for more that just tangible products. Some like zinc or copper can be ingested for health benefits. Copper recycling is one the biggest parts of our business. Let’s talk, however, a bit more about colloidal silver and it’s antibacterial properties.

To understand how colloidal silver gained its credibility for being an effective antibiotic, we need to look into its usages manifest all throughout history.

Early Uses

For countless years, silver is recognized for its healing residential or commercial properties. In fact, the earliest record of silver being utilized for treating illness goes as far back as 4000 B.C. Ancient civilizations, such as Eastern Persia, Ancient Babylonia, and Ancient Greece, were in the practice of positioning water in vessels lined with silver due to the fact that they knew, even then, that this effective metal has disinfectant properties.

Throughout the time of the Romans, silver was used to form substances for medical treatment. This practice was carried on towards the Middle Ages were silver was used extensively as treatment to treat open wounds in battle.

Royalty consumed from silver dishes not just because silver is a valuable metal but likewise due to the fact that it keeps away bacteria, and maybe, this is where the term “bluebloods” come from. Since of the quantity of silver deposits in their tissues, their skin turned bluish-gray, a condition that we now understand as Argyria.

In America, the early settlers used to keep silver dollars in drinking water along with milk in order to avoid wasting. A lot of us might still remember our grannies positioning silver dollars in a jug of milk to preserve its freshness even without refrigeration.

How Colloidal Silver Kills Bacteria

Based upon the early uses of silver, it now end up being clears that individuals acknowledge its usages as a germ-fighting agent. What is colloidal silver? How different is it from plain old silver?

Recycled metals can kill these bacteria
Recycled metals can kill these bacteria

Prior to the 20th century, the just known method of processing silver was by grinding and decreasing it to great powder. This provided a problem considering that the fine silver powder does not remain suspended in the solution for long.

Then, scientists discovered that the majority of the significant fluids in the body, such as blood and lymphatic fluids, were colloids. That is, they are small particles suspended in a liquid base. This paved the way for a new method of processing silver– through electromagnetism.

Some metal recycling can boost health not just help the environment.

This method permits the useful silver particles to remain suspended in water, making it much easier for the body to absorb them and transportation through the bloodstream. When inside the body, colloidal silver kills bacteria by causing havoc in the structure of its membrane surface. A powerful catalyst, colloidal silver has the capability to bind with the hydrogen particles in one-celled organisms (i.e. fungis, germs, and viruses), obstructing respiration and triggering the organism to die and suffocate. This is essentially how colloidal silver kills germs.

Royalty consumed from silver dishes not only since silver is a precious metal but likewise due to the fact that it keeps away bacteria, and maybe, this is where the term “bluebloods” come from. Based on the early uses of silver, it now become clears that people acknowledge its usages as a germ-fighting agent. What is colloidal silver? Once inside the body, colloidal silver kills bacteria by triggering havoc in the structure of its membrane surface. A powerful driver, colloidal silver has the ability to bind with the hydrogen particles in one-celled organisms (i.e. germs, fungis, and infections), obstructing respiration and causing the organism to suffocate and pass away.

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